Jorge is an adventurer. He has been almost all over the world, but Swedish Lapland his new to him. When he steps through the sliding doors on Skellefteå Airport he doesn’t have a clue what he’s doing here. Only that he will need his warmest down jacket and a pair of swim trunks.

During a three day period Jorge experience the subarctic lifestyle, including dogsledding, local sauna and food culture, moose tracking safari, a walk on the Baltic sea and a relay over 25 meters, 0,1 degrees water temperature, in the Winter swim competition in down town Skellefteå. And for course, there is a time to beat. To accompany him is Saleta. A Spanish girl living in Skellefteå.

Snowmobile transfer from the airport.
Boiling coffee.
Cold water.
Dog sledding with Lapland Emotions.
A hole in the ice.
At the Scandinavian Winter Bathing Championship starting line.

THE PANGEA ICE CHALLENGE – ENTERING THE DARK AND COLD
This is the short documentary “The Pangea Ice Challenge – entering the dark and cold”, telling the story of the subarctic lifestyle, the dark and cold and an unforgettable Winter Swim way up north. In Skellefteå and Swedish Lapland.

Learn more
Lantliv Lodge, dog sledding, moose safari and wilderness camp, winter swimming, snowshoes on the frozen sea and everything else Jorge experienced, you can too. Either by booking every each activity via respective company or the concept in its entirety through www.swenature.se.

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