Two friends with a shared love for the Arctic lifestyle, both creative souls and designers, decided to share their love and designs with others. They collected their personal favourites from designers around Swedish Lapland in a small shop, which became a web shop, and now it wants to be even more.

Humans have always created and shared art, design and handicraft. Sometimes serving a functional purpose, perhaps as a status symbol, sometimes just to let your eyes rest on something beautiful – and sometimes everything at once. Two friends, Emma Ebermark and Camilla Mustikka, both creative souls and designers, decided to collect their personal favourites and other gems created by designers around Swedish Lapland and nearby areas. They opened up a shop in the little village Nilivaara, outside Gällivare.

Inspired by location

I meet Emma, one of the founders of Love from Lapland, to talk to her about her love of the Arctic lifestyle, life in general and the little shop in an old store in the village Nilivaara outside Gällivare. A shop that became a web shop and today ships goods all over the world.

“Hi Emma!”
“Hi Emma!”

Yes, we’re both called Emma. We order a coffee each and sit down in the hotel lobby. It’s cold outside and we make small talk about the weather, as one usually does. This leads us to the setting we’re in, the love of it and what life here is like.

“I’m inspired by the nature and culture, and when I create I want to take both man and environment into account. It’s important to include sustainability in the design process and this is a place that inspires that thinking”, Emma tells me.

Hoodie from Kläppi.

Emma has been running the clothing brand Kläppi for some years. Kläppi means ‘kid’ in Meänkieli and the brand includes clothes as well as home decor such as posters and tea towels. Always with a focus on sustainable design and environmentally friendly materials.

She lives in the small village Nilivaara with her family and spends a lot of time in nature.

“The lifestyle here in Swedish Lapland is unique in many ways, and it’s the love of that very lifestyle that drives us, that we want to share with the rest of the world.”

The team behind Love from Lapland, from the left: Mikael Martinsson, Emma Ebermark, Camilla Mustikka, Zarah Cederqvist Matti and Mikael Nilsson.

A driven team

Five people run Love from Lapland: Emma, Emma’s husband Mikael Nilsson, Camilla Mustikka, Zarah Cederqvist, Matti and Mikael Martinsson. Camilla is a jewellery designer and has her own brand as well: Camilla Mustikka. Much like Emma she finds inspiration in the region, its nature and culture. She lives in Kiruna and manages the showroom Love from Lapland has opened there to complement the shop in Nilivaara. Zarah designs knife belts and other functional products and Emma’s husband handles their orders and customer service.

Mikael Martinsson is a photographer with a lot of experience in portraits and product photography. Together with Camilla he takes the beautiful photos found on Love from Lapland’s social media, and on the web page you can see Mikael’s photos.

“All of us at Love from Lapland have unique skills, the key to being able to develop the company continuously. We couldn’t have made this journey on our own; being a strong team is what has made it all possible.”

Handicraft and design

We speak of creating, handicraft and design, and Emma tells me she sometimes struggles with the word handicraft since it usually brings to mind old ways of doing things. The word handicraft actually means “a way of working and producing where the work is small scale and requires great skill, using technically simple tools” (Svensk ordbok 2009). So it’s not about how people did things in the past, but I get her point. What Emma and many other creative people are making today is another kind of handicraft, new handicraft. These days it’s more about handicraft and design, and how to make them work together.

“To me design is products created taking the user into account, combining what’s aesthetic with what’s functional, taking it to a level where it’s economically feasible to make it available to the public. Handicraft could be both, but at present many hear ‘handicraft’ and think it’s small-scale production, something someone has made at home, meant as a decorative item on a shelf.”

Chosen brands and products

The people behind Love from Lapland have collected their personal favourites from designers around Swedish Lapland. Apart from Emma’s and Camilla’s own brands Kläppi and Camilla Mustikka other brands such as Lemmelkaffe, Kero, Care of Gerd, Skogsbärsfröjd and many more are featured. The number of brands available keeps growing.

“To us it’s important that we choose brands and products for the web shop carefully.” There are so many talented designers in our area, and amazing products, but we want to keep a feeling of being genuine. What we sell is chosen especially, things that we like and want to share with others.

A knife belt by Zarah Cederqvist Matti.

Learn more
Love from Lapland is a shop in Nilivaara outside Gällivare, and a web shop that sells products from selected brands and designers from Swedish Lapland and nearby areas. If you want to find out more please visit lovefromlapland.se.

It’s not that unusual wanting to buy something to take home when you visit somewhere new. Something to heighten your memory from the experience. That’s something Love from Lapland can provide.

“Our web shop makes it easy for people to place an order while they are still here, but they don’t have to worry about space in their suitcase or that it might break during their travels. It arrives in a box instead.”

“Our next step is to translate the web shop to English. We want to share what we really love, with everyone.”

Photo courtesy of Love from Lapland.

#lovefromlapland on instagram
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