Outside Båtskärsnäs, in Kalix Municipality, you’ll find Frevisören. A campsite with 40 cabins and a couple of hundred caravan pitches. But above all: as much sea and nature as you could possibly want.

It’s not really the ideal time of year to call Ove Forsberg at Frevisören. But we’ll give it a go. After a slow start to the summer, the season has now begun in earnest. The heat has come to stay along the Swedish Lapland coastline and Ove thinks Frevisören will probably be booked out tonight.

The weather is obviously the main reason why there are so many guests. Another is that so many have discovered the advantages of camping and come back for another summer. The repeat guests are many.

– Yes, the longest-returning guest came here for the first time in 1967. Many seasonal guests come back year after year. Some of our Norwegian guests ‘grew up’ at the campsite when they were kids. And now they’re adults and come back with their own children, Ove says when we get a chance to talk to him.

The longest-returning guest came here for the first time in 1967.

– The guests are mainly Norwegian and Swedish families in high season. But the rest of the time it’s a mix, with RVs and campers from Germany, the Netherlands, Finland and Sweden.

The restaurant has a view over the ocean and becomes a natural meeting point.

A warm beach surrounded by the pine forest

Frevisören is located between Kalix and Haparanda, outside the village Båtskärsnäs, in the Bothnian Bay archipelago. The location is superb. Just turn off route E4 and you’re in another world. All the cabins and pitches have sea views. The bay is shallow and child-friendly. The beach is warm and the sand tickle between your toes. The surrounding pine forest is sparse and inviting for those looking for shade and adventurers going hiking. But for how long has this been a campsite?

– The campsite was opened by Kalix Municipality in the 1960s. Before that, it was a well-known beach, of course, and a natural campsite for those walking down the forest path from Båtskärsnäs. As for myself, I arrived in 2007 and in nearly ten years business has quadrupled. But during that time we’ve invested 12 million SEK – so far, I should add – in new cabins and mini-villas as well as a new reception and restaurant.

– It’s no longer a state-owned enterprise, not even a family business – it’s run 100% professionally, for profit. I believe it’s an important fact to mention because running it for profit means we have to meet the demands of the market.

The bay is shallow and child-friendly.

A wide range of activities

Nature and sea are obvious ingredients when guests choose their activities. Surely your dream holiday features a shallow, sandy beach and that feeling of warm sand between your toes?

Canoeing and swimming, all kinds of water sports – it comes just as natural as lying on the beach not doing anything. There are nice canoeing routes in the area. The Bothnian Bay archipelago is in many ways a canoeist’s paradise, with plenty of light all summer. And there are nice hiking trails in the sparse pine forest that grows along the coast. Perfect for a stroll, or if you’d rather put your trail-running shoes on for a couple hours before getting the barbeque going. Groups of friends might play a bit of beach volleyball and couples go on boat trips in the archipelago.

Canoeing and swimming, all kinds of water sports – it comes just as natural as lying on the beach not doing anything.

In the middle of nature

So what are the advantages of Frevisören and/or Kalix, according to Ove Forsberg?

– Our strength is having the sea as our neighbour. A natural seaside resort. Frevisören is located on a promontory with the Bothnian Bay archipelago on both sides. So nature is the main benefit, I think. But of course, if I’m out and about I also want it to be comfortable. Frevisören has a fully-licensed restaurant. There’s also a shop and a heated pool. There are cabins of all standards available. But the mini-villas, open all year, with six beds and a proper kitchen – you know: cooker, oven, microwave, fridge and freezer – are the best and most comfortable, definitely.

– That kind of place that’s nice to come back to after a whole day full of ‘nature’, Ove says, laughing.

Due to the bright summer nights in Swedish Lapland, you can play beach volley until late in the evening.

Learn more
You can read more about Camp Frevisören at www.frevisoren.se.

Many gems

Frevisören’s location near both Kalix and Haparanda means guests can stay here longer and do day trips. IKEA and all the outlets in Haparanda can be a good option in the unlikely event of rain here on Sweden’s sunniest coast. Café Utblick on the Luppio mountain has awesome views. Jockfall in Överkalix is a mighty waterfall with perhaps the best salmon pool in Sweden, well worth the detour with its ‘Jockfall sandwich’.

– And if it weren’t for the fact that I work the whole summer I’d try to make it out to the islands Malören and Sandskär as often as possible. True archipelago gems, Ove says, before answering a phone stubbornly calling for his attention.

I get the feeling this is the end of our short chat. Ove has more important things to do, that’s for sure. He’s got guests to consider.

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