EXPLORE THE SEA

The Swedish Lapland coastline is over 1,500 kilometres long and includes about 4,000 islands with unique flora and fauna. It's a year-round experience; you can go kayaking all night in the midnight sunlight in summer or go by snowmobile (or even by car!) over the frozen sea to the most remote islands.

Island time
  • Beach life

    Perhaps summer and swimming isn't what first springs to mind when you think of Swedish Lapland. But, in fact, there are plenty of cool beaches and places to go for a swim – thanks to the inland ice.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • The Brewing Coast

    One brewer used to build cars for NASCAR, another is a trained social worker and a third is a business developer at the University of Luleå. Beer interest is growing and in Swedish Lapland, there are many exciting breweries.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Archipelago Days

    What happens when a father and son decide to spend a couple of days on the islands of Swedish Lapland? Well, first you have to promise that there will be mobile phone coverage and then keep your fingers crossed that you’re right. Then you can safely assume there’ll be no trace of the kid during the entire trip.

    Håkan Stenlund

ISLAND HOPPING

Head off into the archipelago of Swedish Lapland on a hot summer’s day. Find a secluded beach with miles of sand, or take a dip in the Baltic Sea.

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In winter
  • Frozen sea

    The ice age is always present along the coast of Swedish Lapland. From the constant land elevation to the barren, windswept frozen sea.

    Ted Logart
  • Walking on water

    There are many ways in which the people of Luleå make light work of the challenges brought forth in the arctic climate in which they live. Like ice skating. And twenty other ways of transport along the icy trails.

    Graeme Richardson
  • The frozen islands

    It was with some trepidation that I joined my first snowmobile tour into what looked like a frozen alien landscape. A place where no sensible person should tread. Sounds dangerous? Let me explain, I am a sailor. Happiest with a full main and perfectly trimmed genoa and standing on a heaving timber deck. Preferably somewhere tropical.

    Graeme Richardson
  • Entering the dark and cold

    This is the short documentary "The Pangea Ice Challenge – entering the dark and cold", telling the story of the subarctic lifestyle, the dark and cold and an unforgettable Winter Swim way up north. In Skellefteå and Swedish Lapland.

    Ted Logart

BREAKING WAVES

The Bothnian Bay is just the perfect place for any sea kayaker who loves an outdoor experience. Secluded and with endless midnight light through the summer just makes it a perfect playground.

WATCH VIDEO

The totally awesome skating

Pretty much everything is considered totally awesome when outdoor enthusiast Per Innala describes the variety of skating opportunities that Swedish Lapland presents. From the mountains, all the way down to the Bay of Bothnia. Watch more videos like this one.

Top 10 things to do in Skellefteå in the summer

Visit a husky-farm, stay over in the Churchtown or go paddle a canoe.

Read more.

Top 10 things to do in Skellefteå in the winter

Winterswim, build your own igloo or learn something new at the Exploriatorium.

Read more.
Discover more from Swedish Lapland
Also read
  • World’s best place for northern lights

    Abisko National Park, in Swedish Lapland, offers some of the best conditions in the world for northern lights watching. The unique climate of the area keep the skies almost clear, and the light pollution is next to nothing. And here, you also find the Aurora Sky Station.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • The eight seasons

    In Swedish Lapland, nature plays an intrinsic role in our life and work, and the people here are highly sensitive to the small details of the changing seasons. Therefore, it seems only natural that the Sami people describe eight seasons instead of four.

    Ella Jonsson
  • A place to preserve

    Just outside Luleå, you'll find the church village Gammelstad. This used to be where Luleå city centre was located right up to the 17th century, with red log cabins in a kind of organised chaos around one of Sweden's most beautiful churches. It's a unique place and something to preserve for future generations.

    Håkan Stenlund