GET A GOOD TASTE OF SWEDISH LAPLAND

In Swedish Lapland, we keep honestly prepared food from local produce close to heart. That comes quite naturally since nature’s pureness and lots of great ingredients surround us. Welcome here and taste all the goodness of nature that has over centuries adapted to life in our subarctic environment.

The good in life
  • 15
    Food

    Wintry Food Safari

    The train from Kiruna, via Abisko, Björkliden, Låktatjåkko, to Riksgränsen isn't just a beautiful journey. If it's done right it can also be a culinary hit.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • 15
    Food

    Welcome to the Veranda

    Verandan – the Veranda – is the new fine-dining restaurant at Icehotel in Jukkasjärvi. The food here takes you on a 12-course, exciting and flavourful trip, all overseen by the charismatic chef Alexander Meier.

    Håkan Stenlund
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    Food

    The gold of the Bothnian bay

    Autumn mist veils the sea and the first September frost has settled on the marshlands. Holiday makers and migratory birds have packed up and gone south. In the Bothnian Bay archipelago, just below the Arctic Circle, fishermen go out to sea. Photographer Anna Öhlund joins them in their hunt for Kalix Löjrom – the Gold of the Bothnian Bay.

    Anna Öhlund

THE ARCTIC KITCHEN

Marcus Jönsson Åberg's grandmother taught him to prepare good food from the ingredients of the Arctic. The forests, the mountains and the rivers in his backyard was the greatest classroom for educating good taste buds. Today Marcus is the creative director at the kitchen of Camp Ripan in Kiruna. This is his take on the tastes of Swedish Lapland.

THE REAL DEAL

It was the Sami that first started evolving our culinary art thousands of
years ago, kettles over an open fire with whatever was on offer
from the surroundings.

Read the story
In the making
  • Arctic fika

    In Sweden we love our coffee, and so-called boiled coffee (coarse ground and brought to the boil in a pan) is in many ways the national drink of Swedish Lapland. Preferably served with all the trimmings: coffee cheese, coffee meat, dried reindeer meat and reindeer tongue.

    Håkan Stenlund
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    Food

    Sápmi slow food

    As far away as you can get from industrial foods, you'll find Sámi food traditions. Nothing goes to waste. Everything has its own unique flavour. Meet Ingrid Pilto, a Sámi food creator.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • The Brewing Coast

    One brewer used to build cars for NASCAR, another is a trained social worker and a third is a business developer at the University of Luleå. Beer interest is growing and in Swedish Lapland, there are many exciting breweries.

    Håkan Stenlund
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    Food

    Meet a food creator

    She made the move from Stockholm to Swedish Lapland in her twenties to work at a mountain station and had her first life changing experience. Several years later she had the next one as she found her calling as an ambassador for the taste of Swedish Lapland. Meet Eva Gunnare – food creator and curious explorer of nature.

    Therese Sidevärn

COFFEE BY LEMMINGS

Markus Lemke lets us in on their secret message and the mission that he and his colleges have been assigned: to bless the world with dark roasted “kokkaffe”. This is his story.

Read the story
Also read
  • World’s best place for northern lights

    Abisko National Park, in Swedish Lapland, offers some of the best conditions in the world for northern lights watching. The unique climate of the area keep the skies almost clear, and the light pollution is next to nothing. And here, you also find the Aurora Sky Station.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • First time dog sledding

    If it’s the first time you have ever met a pack of enthusiastic huskies, no wonder you would be a bit reserved. However, there’s absolutely nothing to be afraid of. Join the British couple Sabina and Pete for their first encounter with some of Skellefteå’s shaggy residents...

    Ted Logart
  • The eight seasons

    In Swedish Lapland, nature plays an intrinsic role in our life and work, and the people here are highly sensitive to the small details of the changing seasons. Therefore, it seems only natural that the Sami people describe eight seasons instead of four.

    Ella Jonsson
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