Fly here

Flying to Swedish Lapland is easy peasy. Here are all airports within or close by our destination. And the airlines that will take you here.

  • Destinations

    17

Fly here

The main airports in Swedish Lapland are Luleå and Kiruna Airport, both SAS and Norwegian fly there with great connections to international flights.

There are also smaller airports like Skellefteå, Gällivare and Arvidsjaur, with good connections to and from Stockholm Arlanda Airport.

Airports in northern Finland are also just a bus ride from Torne River valley in Swedish Lapland, as well as from Norway. See map for airports from the entire European Arctic region.

We also have a number of direct flights from various airports in Europe.

From London Heathrow to Kiruna with Discover the World, or from Amsterdam to Kiruna with Voigt Travel in the winter. In the summer you can get a direct flight from Rotterdam to Skellefteå with Voigt Travel.

In the winter, ProSky offers direct flights from Stuttgart, Köln and Hannover to Arvidsjaur, and FlyCar from Munich, Stuttgart, Frankfurt/Hahn and Hannover.

World’s best place for northern lights

Abisko National Park, in Swedish Lapland, offers some of the best conditions in the world for northern lights watching. T...

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  • The eight seasons

    In Swedish Lapland, nature plays an intrinsic role in our life and work, and the people here are highly sensitive to the small details of the changing seasons. Therefore, it seems only natural that the Sami people describe eight seasons instead of four.

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