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  • A Forest Food Bar

    Mathias Dahlgren won the world chef championship, Bocuse d'Or, already back in 1997 and today he's one of Sweden’s most famous chefs. His restaurant Matsalen at Grand Hotel in Stockholm was named one of the 25 best restaurants in the world. These days Mathias and his chefs also do catering. And sometimes they come to Swedish Lapland.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • The not-so-big five

    Scouting out the 'Big Five' on the African savannah is the big dream of many. They include leopard, lion, elephant, rhino and African buffalo and is a group of large, majestic and fairly dangerous animals. Here in the Arctic part of Sweden, we don't have animals the size of an elephant or with the speed of a leopard, but we have a fair few animals that are pretty cool in their own way. Below we have listed five animals that are both unique and fascinating, definitely worth putting on a list of must-see animals.

    Sara Holm
  • Coffee made by lemmings

    Markus and Rolf were given the mission to bless the world with dark-roast, coarsely ground coffee. Surely, you’ve heard the story about the northern lemmings bringing coffee beans home from Africa, floating home with the Gulf Stream to roast the beans with their body heat, in the Swedish mountains? No? Well, here it is.

    Emma Ebermark

Muohta

Snow is something more than frozen water to the Sami people. It’s a way of expressing the foundation of their existence – the migration of the reindeer. To a skier, snow is also more than sn...

  • A place to preserve

    Just outside Luleå, you'll find the church village Gammelstad. This used to be where Luleå city centre was located right up to the 17th century, with red log cabins in a kind of organised chaos around one of Sweden's most beautiful churches. It's a unique place and something to preserve for future generations.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Catch a Baltic

    How to catch a Baltic salmon in Swedish Lapland? That’s the 100-dollar question for many salmon fly fishermen. But there’s some good news. It’s getting easier. A lot easier. During the last years, salmon runs in the wild Swedish Baltic rivers have been heading in the right direction.

    Ted Logart
  • Adapted for the Arctic

    The habitat and existence of the reindeer are under constant threat. Global warming is now a reality, just as the Ice Age was a reality, about ten thousand years ago. The reindeer adapted to the expansion and retreat of the ice cover. That is how evolution works; over millennia.

    Håkan Stenlund
Explore Swedish Lapland

The king of all mountain trails!

The distance between Abisko and Nikkaluokta is both the most alpine and the most hiked trail in Sweden.

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Welcome to the Veranda

Verandan – the Veranda – is the new fine-dining restaurant at Icehotel in Jukkasjärvi. The food here takes...

  • Midsummer in Swedish Lapland

    When the sun never sets, and the kids are on summer holiday. When holidays are waiting around the corner and meadows explode with wood cranesbill. That's when long lines of cars queue up to get out of the cities. It's time to go find tranquillity with friends and family in summer houses and holidays homes, away from the hustle and bustle. It's time to celebrate the most important holiday of the summer. It's midsummer.

    Emma Ebermark
  • The midnight light

    If it's your first time visiting Swedish Lapland during the summer, you'll notice that it never gets dark. You have entered the world of the midnight sun, and if you're not used to it, it's an extraordinary experience. But beware, it might affect your sleep quality.

    David Björkén
  • The king of all trails

    King's Trail or Kungsleden, is Sweden's longest and most famous trail, and mostly frequented during summer, but it's an equally exiting adventure by skis during winter. Göran Wallin, keen outdoor enthusiasts, gives us the insides to this great trail through the mountains of Swedish Lapland

    Göran Wallin