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  • The waterways

    From the four national rivers to tiny water mirrors in the forest. From rafting boats to kayaks and canoes. It is impossible to miss all the water in Swedish Lapland. Big and small, flowing or still. Perfect for paddlers and the curious.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Gravel roads

    If biking in Swedish Lapland were a song, which song would it be? Take Me Home, Country Roads, John Denver's 1971 hit, would definitely be in the running. Dusty gravel roads, blue mountains and that constant feeling of being right at home.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Running wild

    Running is in human nature. Long before urbanisation, jogging and rubber-soled shoes made tarmac commonplace, we kept to the trails. These days, trail running is enjoying a renaissance. Running for the experience and running for those who prefer personal challenges to personal bests.

    Ted Logart
  • Fat bike fishing

    The barren and vast mountain landscape in the far north, called Sandåslandet – the land of the sand ridges – is as popular amongst devoted fly fishers as suitable for adventurers on fat bikes. I pack my fat bike with enough equipment to last for a week. And I’m off.

    David Björkén
  • The king of all trails

    The King's Trail runs through Sweden's most beautiful mountain scenery and provides more than 400 kilometres' worth of hiking adventure for the first-time hiker as well as the truly experienced mountain veteran. It is one of the world's most famous hiking trails, and the stage between Abisko and Nikkaluokta is the most-travelled trail in all of Sweden.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Driving on ice

    On lake Uddjaur in Arjeplog, is where you'll find one of the coolest driving schools in the world: Lapland Ice Driving. How it came to be is a cold and actually quite a long story.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • The higher land

    The Sámi call it Badjelánnda – the higher land. It's Sweden’s largest national park, right next to the Norwegian border and a part of World Heritage Laponia. A favourite location for those who want to be on their own for a bit. It's the beginning of autumn when Håkan Stenlund sets his sights on Consul Persson's cabin. A lonesome trek back.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • The hiking guide

    Hiking can be an amazing experience, but it can also turn into a real challenge. Spending time in the mountains means you have to be able to rely on yourself, your knowledge and your choices. We've put together some good advice below to make sure you have an amazing – and safe – mountain experience.

    Emma Forsberg
  • To the top of Nieras

    The road to Ritsem through World Heritage Laponia is probably one of the most beautiful roads in Sweden. It is also an easy way to get straight to a high-mountain environment with fantastic opportunities for ski touring. The mountain Nieras at Stora Sjöfallet is an amazing and easily accessible ski touring gem.

    David Björkén
  • Breaking the ice

    To go on a boat trip and take a swim while you’re at it is a pretty common activity around the world, in Swedish Lapland as well. But in Piteå, just a hundred kilometres south of the polar circle, the considerably less common twist is that the boat trip happens in minus 20 degrees Celsius with an icebreaker that weighs in at 400 metric tons.

    Anders Westergren
  • Winter fat biking

    There is something special about biking. The freedom. Access to trails as well as beautiful views. And there is something very special about biking on a fat bike. Have you ever tried a fat bike? Perhaps you have, but not in Swedish Lapland. Let me tell you about darkness and light.

    Sanne Brännström
  • Swim, bike and run

    Laponia Triathlon 67°N is a full-distance triathlon above the Arctic Circle. Participants from around the world gather in Gällivare to swim, bike and run under the midnight sun.

    Emma Forsberg
  • The big closing party

    It's all about turning. No jumps, no flips, no rails. Just the beautiful art of being able to turn on a snowboard. But apart from that Riks Banked Slalom is just a great happening in May.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • A ski expedition in Sarek

    Rosemary Rayfuse gave herself a ski expedition in Sarek National Park as a birthday gift for herself – and she would not regret it. This is her story from the Sarek Ski Expedition.

    Rosemary Rayfuse
  • Speed upon the King’s Trail

    The world's most successful trail runner, Tina Emelie Forsberg, ran the entire King's Trail in summer 2018. When others take three to four weeks to do a 'through hike', Emelie ran it in less than five days.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Spring in Kiruna mountain world

    Spring-winter in Swedish Lapland is something else. And when it arrives, the mountain cabins along the King's Trail opens up

    Anna Skogh Marit Kangas
  • Forest life in Svanstein

    Good skiing usually depends on one thing and one thing only: good snow. But good snow has many enemies. Sunshine, temperature and wind can all mess with the fluffiness of snow. It's best protected by forest, and allegedly the best forest grows in Svanstein.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Life at Pinetree Lodge

    Four kilometres beyond the end of the public road you'll find the village Särkimukka in the Torne Valley. In the middle of the woods, on a frozen lake, this is home to some ten people and hundreds of dogs. Still, the bar is full tonight.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • A run through magical mountains

    The helicopter takes us to the starting point, 17 kilometres out in the roadless land. The mountain terrain is magical, I cannot find a better word to describe it. Then there are sweat, pain, and doubts. Followed by laughter, pleasure, and euphoria. When it’s all over, all I can think about is: Why don’t all races take place in the mountains of Swedish Lapland?

    Petter Norén
  • An autumn hike in Abisko

    Autumn… It can be really boring… and dreary… and just… just wonderful! Autumn is so immediate; it makes its first appearance after a chilly night and then moves on at full speed. Its colours and clear air must be experienced in the same immediate way: right now!

    Maria Sirviö
  • The top of Duolbagorni

    There are a lot of great climbing routes in the Kebnekaise massif. Pick a route based on knowledge and experience, or on what you feel like doing. One of the most well-known routes is the 'Silhouette' on Duolbagorni. A 1,000-metre wall. We'll choose a different route for today.

    Göran Wallin
  • Time to go hiking

    Getting just the right amount of physical activity will do you good. This is common knowledge. It is also said that nature is a healer for both body and soul. Maybe more so than ever in late summer when the colours begin to change, from sharply green to fiery red and orange. The air becomes wonderfully crisp and fresh, filling your lungs and your mind with energy.

    Ted Logart
  • Girls night out

    Arjeplog claims to have an archipelago in the middle of the mountains. They also decided that it should never be impossible to reach the highest mountain. Even if it might be difficult to spell the name of the mountain in question sometimes.

    Annika Fredriksson
  • The Nordenskiöld race

    The world's longest cross-country ski race, 220 km, take place in Jokkmokk. How did it all begin, and why?

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Skating in the dark

    Bob de Jong is an Olympic champion. He's also the oldest skater in modern times to win an Olympic medal. Last winter he went for a couple of runs up in Swedish Lapland.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Skiing under the northern lights

    Last year, in February, three of the world's greatest freeskiers, Reine Barkered, Aurelien Ducroz and Jackie Paaso, went to Björkliden to see the northern lights and do some skiing. I called up Reine to ask how their trip went. And some other stuff too.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • An extreme race through Laponia

    Ice Ultra is a trial of strength for the hardy. 230 kilometres on foot in February, through one of Europe's perhaps most mythical mountain landscapes.

    Iréne Lundström
  • On skis through Sarek

    Picture yourself on a pair of skis, with nothing but mountains and snow as far as the eye can see. But a direction, a goal somewhere behind all those mountains. Hear mountain guide Mirja, describe it with her own words.

    Mirja Andersson
  • Skating under the northern lights

    The Dutch filmmaker Marco Lubbers had a dream: To go speedskating under the northern lights. And he also wanted to make a film about it. For that, he travelled to Swedish Lapland.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • First time dog sledding

    If it’s the first time you have ever met a pack of enthusiastic huskies, no wonder you would be a bit reserved. However, there’s absolutely nothing to be afraid of. Join the British couple Sabina and Pete for their first encounter with some of Skellefteå’s shaggy residents...

    Ted Logart
  • Entering the dark and cold

    This is the short documentary "The Pangea Ice Challenge – entering the dark and cold", telling the story of the subarctic lifestyle, the dark and cold and an unforgettable Winter Swim way up north. In Skellefteå and Swedish Lapland.

    Ted Logart
  • On horseback towards Kebnekaise

    Johanna hasn't ridden a horse for 13 years; Carl-Johan has never sat on a horse in his life. Follow them on a horseback tour through the Kiruna mountains with the guide Kerstin from Ofelaš Icelandic Horses, a Sami company certified by Nature's Best.

    Johanna Ögren
  • Trail running in Ammarnäs

    Trail running is becoming more and more popular, and it turns out that the mountains around Ammarnäs are ideally suited for the purpose.

    Maria Broberg
  • Hiking along the coast

    Hike through dense forests, across vast fields, along old country roads and through the majestic river landscape. Experience local culture and take a break at one of the beautiful rest stops. The Solander trail allows you to experience the multifaceted natural and cultural landscape of the Swedish Lapland coast, up close.

    Britta Elfving-Persson
  • Trail running the King’s trail

    The most common way to experience King’s Trail (Kungsleden) is walking or skiing in a comfortable pace. But there are other ways – come along on an up-tempo journey through the scenic mountains of Swedish Lapland when Krissy, Luke and Fredrik takes on the challenge of spending a week running along this famous trail.

    Therese Sidevärn
  • Walking the King’s Trail changed my life

    When Agata Mieczko from Italy first heard about the King's Trail, she knew she had to walk it. It turned out be a life-changing experience.

    Agata Mleczko
  • The call of the wild

    Dog sledding through vast expanses of white is in many ways synonymous with a winter adventure in Swedish Lapland. Håkan Stenlund took a tour with the company Erlebnis Wildnis in the Vindelfjällen Nature Reserve. Following the footsteps of Jack London, in a way.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Frozen sea

    The ice age is always present along the coast of Swedish Lapland. From the constant land elevation to the barren, windswept frozen sea.

    Ted Logart
  • Into the winter

    When the rest of Sweden prepare for spring, Björkliden and Riksgränsen open for the winter season. Håkan Stenlund goes north, to the playground of the fanatics.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Biking in the mountains

    Olov, a true biking enthusiast packed his bike and went up the mountains, took a dip in the Atlantic ocean and rode along the sandy beaches on the islands of Swedish Lapland. And he brought a friend – Kevin. Let's play 'Have you met Kevin?'

    Olov Stenlund
  • Snow and ice biking

    Fore some, riding a bike is a lifestyle. But if you live in a subarctic climate, how does one maintain a lifestyle mainly adapted to the summer season? Hitch a ride with Olov, a Fat Bike enthusiast making tracks on the frozen sea.

    Olov Stenlund
  • Showdown on wheels

    How to make the most of the autumn in Swedish Lapland as a biking nerd. Follow Olov and his friends on a epic downhill biking adventure in Björkliden and Abisko, where the scenery leaves them astounded.

    Olov Stenlund
  • Hit the slopes

    Being outdoors is a natural part of the arctic lifestyle, and during winter – skiing is the way to go. Pro or beginner, Swedish Lapland offers it all. You just need to find your flavour among our resorts. Here is our top five for downhill skiing like a champ!

    Therese Sidevärn
  • A family passion

    As the warm and personable owners of Svedjekojan, Caisa and Ulf and their beautiful and enthusiastic sled dogs are your guides to fulfilling this snowy adventure that is on so many bucket lists.

    Georgia Makitalo
  • Vast contrasts

    The resort Riksgränsen is situated on the border of Sweden and Norway — just as the name in Swedish suggests. This is the last outpost and when the blizzards reign, also where the road ends. Nevertheless, the train stop is less than one hundred metres from the hotel and the base station of the ski lifts.

    Therese Sidevärn
  • Kebnekaise in spring colours

    My relationship with Kebnekaise was established long before I saw her in real life. I'm a bit uncertain as to whether it's right to assign a gender to a mountain or not. But the Kebnekaise I first got to know was a woman, that’s for sure.

    Anders Westergren