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  • The land of the Sámi

    The Sámi culture is traditionally strong, and since the Sámi have lived and worked in northern Sweden for millennia, the culture is a big part of our Arctic lifestyle in Swedish Lapland.

    Linnea Eriksson
  • An unbeatable
    eco-experience

    Small-scale, hosting and proximity to nature. Curiosity, knowledge and learning. During her visit to Geunja the Sámi Eco Lodge in the mountain landscape surrounding Ammarnäs, Maria lived in complete harmony with nature. Something happened there, and an inner journey commenced.

    Maria Broberg
  • A place to preserve

    Just outside Luleå, you'll find the church village Gammelstad. This used to be where Luleå city centre was located right up to the 17th century, with red log cabins in a kind of organised chaos around one of Sweden's most beautiful churches. It's a unique place and something to preserve for future generations.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • The eight seasons

    In Swedish Lapland, nature plays an intrinsic role in our life and work, and the people here are highly sensitive to the small details of the changing seasons. Therefore, it seems only natural that the Sámi people describe eight seasons instead of four.

    Ella Jonsson
  • Christmas

    It is December and the landscape is covered in a white blanket; trees are heavy with snow and the roads are white. The dense mid-winter darkness creates a blue light during a few hours, and windows are lit up by advent stars and candlesticks. Christmas is here.

    Emma Ebermark
  • Visut – a story of the reindeer

    Our home, Swedish Lapland, has been formed by the Ice Age, the seasons and the reindeer. And we, too, have lived our lives in the shadow of the forces of nature.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Midsummer in Swedish Lapland

    When the sun never sets, and the kids are on summer holiday. When holidays are waiting around the corner and meadows explode with wood cranesbill. That's when long lines of cars queue up to get out of the cities. It's time to go find tranquillity with friends and family in summer houses and holidays homes, away from the hustle and bustle. It's time to celebrate the most important holiday of the summer. It's midsummer.

    Emma Ebermark
  • Arctic fika

    In Sweden we love our coffee, and so-called boiled coffee (coarse ground and brought to the boil in a pan) is in many ways the national drink of Swedish Lapland. Preferably served with all the trimmings: coffee cheese, coffee meat, dried reindeer meat and reindeer tongue.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Anything but wilderness

    On a headland called Viedásnjárgga in Stora Sjöfallet National Park lies Naturum Laponia. It's a place that tells a story of mountains on the other side of the lake and how reindeer find their way here year after year. It tells part of the story why this place was awarded the title World Heritage.

    Emma Forsberg
  • An art gallery that will tug your heartstrings

    A rainy day in Boden, or an overly warm one – not too uncommon during our subarctic summers – is perfect for a visit to Havremagasinet, which is one of Sweden’s largest art galleries, spanning 3,600 square metres over six floors.

    Anna Bergström
  • 5 questions to 5 Sámi designers

    Sámi design comes in many shapes. From traditional leather hats to a blue dress at the Nobel Banquet. Some of Sweden's coolest designers have taken the Sámi expression further – to put some excitement into everyday life.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • The forest Samis

    When going to visit Årstidsfolket, a destination offering Sami experiences, you will travel along winding roads through miles and miles of forest. Here, you will cross the line between past and present, old growth forests meet newly felled ones and old Forest Sami myths and traditions meet with Swedish society.

    Anna Bergström
  • Jokkmokk Winter Market

    On the first weekend in February, every year since 1605, the Jokkmokk market is held. Apart from world-class Sami art, culture and handicraft, visitors are normally greeted by proper, cold winter weather.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Stories told with names

    Many towns, mountains, rivers in Swedish Lapland bear the names given to them by the Sámi people, usually describing their characteristics. When reading a map of Swedish Lapland, knowing the meaning of some Sámi words adds another, fascinating dimension to the landscape.

    Göran Wallin
  • A taste of history and nature

    Since 1605, for over 400 years, Jokkmokk’s wonderful Winter Market has been held annually beginning on the first Thursday in February. Attracting tens of thousands of visitors from around the world, the market remains the foremost meeting place for Sámi peoples across the entire Sápmi region.

    Ella Jonsson