EXPERIENCE SÁMI CULTURE FIRST HAND

Sápmi is what the Sámi call their land, an area that stretches over Norway, Sweden, Finland and the Kola Peninsula in Russia. In Sweden, Sápmi covers the most northern part. It is a nation without borders but not without a history, culture and a language, very much entwined with the reindeer.

Stories from Sápmi
  • Visut

    Our home, Swedish Lapland, has been formed by the Ice Age, the seasons and the reindeer. And we, too, have lived our lives in the shadow of the forces of nature.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • The mindset of Geunja

    Even with people there, the calmness of the place stands out. Geunja Sámi Eco Lodge stands there, carefully tucked in between the shores of a crystal clear lake and the foot of a high mountain.

    Maria Broberg
  • The embroidered
    resistance art

    She celebrates her 40th anniversary as an artist, Sámi narrator Britta Marakatt-Labba. This is also how long it has taken Swedes to discover her art. The breakthrough was international for this resistance artist who tells her story with the needle as a brush.

    Håkan Stenlund

THE LAND OF THE SÁMI

The Sámi culture is traditionally strong, and since the Sámi have lived and worked in northern Sweden for millennia, the culture is a big part of our Arctic lifestyle in Swedish Lapland.

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SÁMI DESIGN

Sámi design comes in many shapes. Some of Sweden’s coolest designers have taken the Sámi expression further – to put some excitement into everyday life

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LEILA NUTTI

Simply put, painter and craft artist Leila Nutti is a jack of all trades. But what she does is perhaps more aptly described by the Sámi word árbediehtu. When she turned 18, her father registered a company in her name. That’s just how things are in the Nutti family.
Read the full story.

GEUNJA

Some claim Geunja is one of the best-kept secrets of Swedish Lapland, not least the fortunate ones who have gotten a humbling glimpse of the everyday life here in the Arctic as a Sami.

Get a glimpse
Traditions & culture
  • Stories told with names

    Many towns, mountains, rivers in Swedish Lapland bear the names given to them by the Sámi people, usually describing their characteristics. When reading a map of Swedish Lapland, knowing the meaning of some Sámi words adds another, fascinating dimension to the landscape.

    Göran Wallin
  • Jokkmokk’s market

    On the first weekend in February, every year since 1606, Jokkmokk's market is held. Apart from world-class Sámi art, culture and handicraft, visitors are usually greeted by proper, cold winter weather.

    Håkan Stenlund

A HYMN TO HOME

Lennart Pittja runs the award-winning eco-lodge Sápmi Nature Camp in the Laponia world heritage in Swedish Lapland, on the grounds his sámi reindeer herding community Unna Tjerusj has inhabited for generations.

Watch

World Heritage Laponia

On a headland called Viedásnjárgga in Stora Sjöfallet National Park lies Naturum Laponia. It’s a place that tells a story of mountains on the other side of the lake and how reindeer find their way here year after year. It tells part of the story why this place was awarded the title World Heritage.
Read the full story.

Also read
  • The midnight light

    If it's your first time visiting Swedish Lapland during the summer, you'll notice that it never gets dark. You have entered the world of the midnight sun, and if you're not used to it, it's an extraordinary experience. But beware, it might affect your sleep quality.

    David Björkén
  • World’s best place for northern lights

    Abisko National Park, in Swedish Lapland, offers some of the best conditions in the world for northern lights watching. The unique climate of the area keep the skies almost clear, and the light pollution is next to nothing. And here, you also find the Aurora Sky Station.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • The woods

    A breath of fresh air never hurts. That has always been our roundabout way of trying to explain what it is that makes nature good for us human beings. But the results of more and more research in recent years have shown just how beneficial spending time in the great outdoors is for human health and wellbeing. Science confirms a piece of time-honoured folk wisdom. It’s time for a walk in the woods.

    Håkan Stenlund