• The Palm Family

    If you were to define skiing, it is ultimately about two planks and a passion. If you were to define skiers, however, they would probably be called the Palm family.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Fly fisher for life

    Some of the best and most scenic fly fishing in Sweden is found at Miekak fishing camp in the Arjeplog mountains. To some of its guests, it is something of a craving.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • In sauna veritas

    Sauna, or bastu in Swedish, is something as natural to people in the north as the midnight sun and the northern lights. It used to be something of a prerequisite for life in the Arctic, and now it is a rich part of the culture itself. Sauna is the essence of life up here.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Biking the mountains

    The mountain bike is said to have been invented in California in the 1970s. But the truth is that as long as there have been bikes, we have biked the paths, even in the mountains. But with today's modern mountain bikes, mountain biking has become a bit easier.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • At the outmost rim

    To get to the atoll-like island Malören, fifteen nautical miles across the open sea from Kalix, it takes a boat trip of about an hour. Once you are there, the serenity that these nautical miles provide extends itself. The sea becomes a buffer zone of time and space. Because nothing can disturb you or reach you. You are at home, by the sea.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Árbediehtu

    Simply put, painter and craft artist Leila Nutti is a jack of all trades. But what she does is perhaps more aptly described by the Sámi word árbediehtu.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • The embroidered
    resistance art

    She celebrates her 40th anniversary as an artist, Sámi narrator Britta Marakatt-Labba. This is also how long it has taken Swedes to discover her art. The breakthrough was international for this resistance artist who tells her story with the needle as a brush.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • The gold of the Bothnian Bay

    Kalix Löjrom, Kalix vendace roe, became Sweden's first food product to receive a protected designation of origin ten years ago. We tag along on a vendace roe safari to learn how this delicacy becomes one of the best dining experiences Swedish restaurants have to offer. We also get the opportunity to make our own roe. But first: a visit to the pub.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Visut

    Our home, Swedish Lapland, has been formed by the Ice Age, the seasons and the reindeer. And we, too, have lived our lives in the shadow of the forces of nature.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • The great race of mercy

    In Junosuando, a village located on the Arctic Circle in Swedish Lapland, there's a statue of Leonhard Seppala. He's one of the world's most famous mushers. This is the story about Leonhard himself, his dog Togo, and what became known as "The Great Race of Mercy".

    Håkan Stenlund
  • The land of the Sámi

    The Sámi culture is traditionally strong, and since the Sámi have lived and worked in northern Sweden for millennia, the culture is a big part of our Arctic lifestyle in Swedish Lapland.

    Linnea Eriksson
  • When to see the northern lights in Swedish Lapland

    Shimmery and magical. The dance of the northern lights is a spectacular sight that we frequently enjoy in Swedish Lapland. Viewing the Aurora Borealis is both a jaw-dropping and mystical experience. But when is the best time to see the northern lights in Swedish Lapland?

    Emma Forsberg
  • World’s best place for northern lights

    Abisko National Park, in Swedish Lapland, offers some of the best conditions in the world for northern lights watching. The unique climate of the area keep the skies almost clear, and the light pollution is next to nothing. And here, you also find the Aurora Sky Station.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Architectural dreams

    There is this one hotel room that looks like a bird's nest, and another resembles a UFO. Then there is the hotel where a ruin from an old train workshop runs straight through the kitchen, and the wine cellar is an old grease pit. There is also the hotel in the middle of town that cleans the air to the same extent an entire forest would. We travel between excellent accommodation options in Swedish Lapland.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • The aurora whisperer

    Experiencing the northern lights is on many people's bucket list. Travellers from around the world head north to experience the celestial phenomenon, hoping to snap a picture of it. Been there, done that. But then some live with the northern lights as a lifestyle. Meet photographer Mia Stålnacke, the one who stops the northern lights.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • The Arctic light

    You might think that in the Arctic, we have darkness or daylight. In the winter, the sun never rises above the horizon, and in the summer, the sun never sets. But in fact, we have light all year round. Just different kinds of light. Some darker, some brighter, and some very colourful.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Catching the stars

    When I turn my headlight off everything turns black. First I can't see anything, not even my hand in front of my face. Soon my eyes get used to the darkness and above me, a starry sky slowly lights up, so clear it makes me shiver. This is how our ancestors experienced the starry sky: sparkling and clear. I start to feel a breath-taking sense of humility and reverence.

    David Björkén
  • Sápmi slow food

    As far away as you can get from industrial foods, you'll find Sámi food traditions. Nothing goes to waste. Everything has its own unique flavour. Meet Ingrid Pilto, a Sámi food creator.

    Maria Broberg
  • The food story

    Eating well is part of every journey. Well, it could be the whole reason for the trip. This is the food story.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • The woods

    A breath of fresh air never hurts. That has always been our roundabout way of trying to explain what it is that makes nature good for us human beings. But the results of more and more research in recent years have shown just how beneficial spending time in the great outdoors is for human health and wellbeing. Science confirms a piece of time-honoured folk wisdom. It’s time for a walk in the woods.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • An autumn hike in the mountains

    Autumn has only just claimed the land. Warm days in the sunshine, but cold at night when that same sun disappears behind the mountains. The landscape is coloured by the demands of the season. This is a story of a September hike around Šielmmáčohkka and upper Visttásvággi. A hike in a time of contrasts.

    David Björkén
  • Coffee made by lemmings

    Markus and Rolf were given the mission to bless the world with dark-roast, coarsely ground coffee. Surely, you’ve heard the story about the northern lemmings bringing coffee beans home from Africa, floating home with the Gulf Stream to roast the beans with their body heat, in the Swedish mountains? No? Well, here it is.

    Emma Ebermark
  • Photograph the northern lights

    So you've gone to Swedish Lapland, Sweden's Arctic destination, to experience the magical northern lights. Here are seven tips on how to get some good pictures of the beautiful light phenomenon to take back home.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Shooting autumn colours

    Many think autumn is the most beautiful time of year in Swedish Lapland. It's as if Earth itself grants a generous firework display of colour before the winter sleep settles over the Arctic landscape. And it's easy to capture the show with a camera on standby. These are five simple tips for capturing autumn in a photo.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Midsummer

    When the sun never sets, and the kids are on summer holiday. When holidays are waiting around the corner and meadows explode with wood cranesbill. That's when long lines of cars queue up to get out of the cities. It's time to go find tranquillity with friends and family in summer houses and holidays homes, away from the hustle and bustle. It's time to celebrate the most important holiday of the summer. It's midsummer.

    Emma Ebermark
  • Stories told with names

    Many towns, mountains, rivers in Swedish Lapland bear the names given to them by the Sámi people, usually describing their characteristics. When reading a map of Swedish Lapland, knowing the meaning of some Sámi words adds another, fascinating dimension to the landscape.

    Göran Wallin
  • Towards Kebnekaise

    Johanna hasn't ridden a horse for 13 years, and Carl-Johan has never sat on a horse in his life. Follow them on a horseback tour through the Kiruna mountains.

    Johanna Ögren
  • The waterways

    From the four national rivers to tiny water mirrors in the forest. From rafting boats to kayaks and canoes. It is impossible to miss all the water in Swedish Lapland. Big and small, flowing or still. Perfect for paddlers and the curious.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • The secret stone valley

    In Sámi it's called Geargevággi, which translates to Stone Valley in English. But in real life, it might as well be a fairytale.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Archipelago days

    What happens when a father and son decide to spend a couple of days in the Gulf of Bothnia archipelago? Well, first, you have to promise that there will be mobile phone coverage and then keep your fingers crossed that you’re right. Then you can safely assume there’ll be no trace of the kid during the entire trip.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • The blueberry

    Blueberries are one of the most common plants in Sweden, loved by both humans and animals. Not only are the sweet little berries tasty, but they are also very good for you: magic and science in symbiosis. Thanks to the midnight sun, the berries here in the Arctic part of Sweden are also a little sweeter, a little more aromatic and a little more vitamin-rich.

    Linnea Eriksson
  • Anything but wilderness

    On a headland called Viedásnjárgga in Stora Sjöfallet National Park lies Naturum Laponia. It's a place that tells a story of mountains on the other side of the lake and how reindeer find their way here year after year. It tells part of the story why this place was awarded the title World Heritage.

    Emma Forsberg
  • The not-so-big five

    Scouting out the 'Big Five' on the African savannah is the big dream of many. They include leopard, lion, elephant, rhino and African buffalo and is a group of large, majestic and fairly dangerous animals. Here in the Arctic part of Sweden, we don't have animals the size of an elephant or with the speed of a leopard, but we have a fair few animals that are pretty cool in their own way. Below we have listed five animals that are both unique and fascinating, definitely worth putting on a list of must-see animals.

    Sara Holm
  • Swim, bike, run

    Competitors from all around the world gather under the midnight sun to participate in the world's most northernmost triathlon with ironman distances; Laponia Triathlon 67N°.

    Emma Forsberg
  • Salmontrippin’

    A tanked-up car, robust rod holders and a few intensely driven salmon fishers as the company is an excellent start if you're going to do some severe salmontrippin' in Swedish Lapland. This is the story of three high-pitched days in four wild salmon rivers.

    Ted Logart
  • The labyrinths
    on the islands

    When you visit the islands of Swedish Lapland, you might stumble upon stones laid out in a formation. Maybe it's actually an old labyrinth that you’ve found? The phenomena are tens of thousands years old, and the pattern can be found in different places across Europe.

    Göran Wallin
  • The longest silence

    If a fish, or a catch, is to be a story, the fish has to be out of the ordinary, preferably bordering on dangerous. And if the story is to become a classic, the fish should be as big as a whale or the fisher should at least be a character like Captain Ahab.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • The midnight light

    If it's your first time visiting Swedish Lapland during the summer, you'll notice that it never gets dark. You have entered the world of the midnight sun, and if you're not used to it, it's an extraordinary experience. But beware, it might affect your sleep quality.

    David Björkén
  • Durable fashion

    Imagine a pair of shoes that just gets better with age. With feeling and respect for material and craftsmanship, Kero creates durable and trendy products that just look better with use.

    Emma Forsberg
  • The forest is yours

    Is it really true that anyone can walk around the forests and beaches of Swedish Lapland? Pick berries and pitch a tent anywhere? Yup, that's exactly what it's like in the democratic forest.

    Maria Sirviö
  • Outdoor fika

    That Swedes have their fika (coffee and a snack), and that they drink lots of coffee, are well-known facts. But what's the thing about having it outdoors? What's the deal with coffee boiled over an open fire?

    Maria Sirviö
  • Gravel roads

    If biking in Swedish Lapland were a song, which song would it be? Take Me Home, Country Roads, John Denver's 1971 hit, would definitely be in the running. Dusty gravel roads, blue mountains and that constant feeling of being right at home.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Running wild

    Running is in human nature. Long before urbanisation, jogging and rubber-soled shoes made tarmac commonplace, we kept to the trails. These days, trail running is enjoying a renaissance. Running for the experience and running for those who prefer personal challenges to personal bests.

    Ted Logart
  • A stay in history

    Once upon a time, Haparanda was where the East met West, a hangout for spies, robbers and war profiteers. If the walls of Stadshotellet – the city hotel – could speak, we would be more than excited to listen to what went on in what once was the middle of the world.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Beach life in the Arctic

    Perhaps summer and swimming aren't what first springs to mind when you think of Swedish Lapland. But, in fact, there are plenty of cool beaches and places to go for a swim – thanks to the inland ice.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • A road trip for the hungry

    A road trip is simply a way of discovering things you've never seen before. If you give yourself the chance, you might also come across flavours you've never experienced before.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • The chef and
    the reindeer herder

    Mathias Dahlgren won the world chef championship, Bocuse d'Or, already back in 1997, and today, he's one of Sweden’s most famous chefs. His previous restaurant Matsalen, at Grand Hôtel in Stockholm, was named one of the 25 best restaurants in the world. These days Mathias and his chefs also do catering. And sometimes they come to Swedish Lapland.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • The taste of
    Swedish Lapland

    When you visit Swedish Lapland, you will notice that our food culture is closely intertwined with our lifestyle. There is a strong tradition that testifies to how we have lived from what nature has generously provided us with for many millennia. Join us on a guided tour of our natural resources, taking the shortest possible route to the plate.

    Therese Sidevärn
  • An unbeatable
    eco-experience

    Small-scale, hosting and proximity to nature. Curiosity, knowledge and learning. During her visit to Geunja the Sámi Eco Lodge in the mountain landscape surrounding Ammarnäs, Maria lived in complete harmony with nature. Something happened there, and an inner journey commenced.

    Maria Broberg
  • Fat bike fishing

    The barren and vast mountain landscape in the far north, called Sandåslandet – the land of the sand ridges – is as popular amongst devoted fly fishers as suitable for adventurers on fat bikes. I pack my fat bike with enough equipment to last for a week. And I’m off.

    David Björkén
  • The King of all trails

    The King's Trail runs through Sweden's most beautiful mountain scenery and provides more than 400 kilometres' worth of hiking adventure for the first-time hiker as well as the truly experienced mountain veteran. It is one of the world's most famous hiking trails, and the stage between Abisko and Nikkaluokta is the most-travelled trail in all of Sweden.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • The way we eat

    When in Swedish Lapland, exploring the nature of the Arctic, chasing the northern lights or just soaking up the sun 24/7, make sure you don’t miss out on the food. Some of the food we eat might sound a bit strange, but we highly recommend you try and get a taste of Swedish Lapland.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • The bestseller

    Photographer Mattias Fredriksson started as a cleaner at Hotel Riksgränsen. Then he picked up a camera. Today he's the most published skiing photographer in the world, still with a soft spot for the old mountain hotel in his heart.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • The mindset of Geunja

    Even with people there, the calmness of the place stands out. Geunja Sámi Eco Lodge stands there, carefully tucked in between the shores of a crystal clear lake and the foot of a high mountain.

    Maria Broberg
  • Driving on ice

    On lake Uddjaur in Arjeplog, is where you'll find one of the coolest driving schools in the world: Lapland Ice Driving. How it came to be is a cold and actually quite a long story.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • The call of the wild

    Dog sledding through vast expanses of white is in many ways synonymous with a winter adventure in Swedish Lapland. Håkan Stenlund took a tour in the Vindelfjällen Nature Reserve. Following the footsteps of Jack London, in a way.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • A place to preserve

    Just outside Luleå, you'll find the church village Gammelstad. This used to be where Luleå city centre was located right up to the 17th century, with red log cabins in a kind of organised chaos around one of Sweden's most beautiful churches. It's a unique place and something to preserve for future generations.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Catch a Baltic

    How to catch a Baltic salmon in Swedish Lapland? That’s the 100-dollar question for many salmon fly fishers. But there’s some good news. It’s getting easier. A lot easier. During the last years, salmon runs in the wild Swedish Baltic rivers have been heading in the right direction.

    Ted Logart
  • Arctic fika

    In Sweden, we love our coffee, and so-called boiled coffee (coarse ground and brought to the boil in a pan) is in many ways the national drink of Swedish Lapland. Preferably served with all the trimmings: coffee cheese, coffee meat, dried reindeer meat and reindeer tongue.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Adapted for the Arctic

    The habitat and existence of the reindeer are under constant threat. Global warming is now a reality, just as the Ice Age was a reality, about ten thousand years ago. The reindeer adapted to the expansion and retreat of the ice cover. That is how evolution works; over millennia.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • The higher land

    The Sámi call it Badjelánnda – the higher land. It's Sweden’s largest national park, right next to the Norwegian border and a part of World Heritage Laponia. A favourite location for those who want to be on their own for a bit. It's the beginning of autumn when Håkan Stenlund sets his sights on Consul Persson's cabin. A lonesome trek back.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • The hiking guide

    Hiking can be an amazing experience, but it can also turn into a real challenge. Spending time in the mountains means you have to be able to rely on yourself, your knowledge and your choices. We've put together some good advice below to make sure you have an amazing – and safe – mountain experience.

    Emma Forsberg
  • Chad chose Abisko

    In 2008 photographer Chad Blakley moved to Abisko to work the summer season. He followed the love of his life: Linnea. They both quickly fell for the breath-taking landscape and the welcoming people in the village. So, Chad and Linnea decided to stay the winter as well. But it would be many more summers and winters in Abisko.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Frozen sea

    The ice age is always present along the coast of Swedish Lapland. From the constant land elevation to the barren, windswept frozen sea.

    Ted Logart
  • Panoramic view over Rapadalen from summit of Skierfe, Sarek National Park, Lapland, Sweden.

    The national parks

    National parks are areas featuring a certain type of landscape, protected to preserve their natural condition. It's about creating opportunities to experience nature. Swedish Lapland has the most, the oldest and the largest national parks in Sweden.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • A frozen icon

    In the village of Jukkasjärvi, outside Kiruna, lies the original ICEHOTEL. Every year, since 1989, it has been reincarnated in a new rendition and there’s always more to come. From the beginning this was kind of a crazy idea in the winter, nowadays it’s as crazy all year round.

    Emma Forsberg
  • The Nordenskiöld Race

    The world’s longest cross-country ski race, 220 km, take place in Jokkmokk and has a history that traces back as far back as 1884. How did it all begin? And why?

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Between two worlds

    Two villages with the same name on either side of the mighty Torne River. Kukkolaforsen is something very special and in many ways, it proves that the Torne Valley is a world of its own, filled with tastes and experiences.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Hit the slopes

    Being outdoors is a natural part of the arctic lifestyle, and during winter – skiing is the way to go. Pro or beginner, Swedish Lapland offers it all. You just need to find your flavour among our resorts. Here is our top five for downhill skiing like a champ!

    Therese Sidevärn
  • Muohta

    Snow is something more than frozen water to the Sámi people. It's a way of expressing the foundation of their existence – the migration of the reindeer. To a skier, snow is also more than snow. It's the way you experience life.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Ice Ultra

    Ice Ultra is a trial of strength for the hardy. 230 kilometres on foot in February, through one of Europe's perhaps most mythical mountain landscapes.

    Iréne Lundström
  • Some of the best cheeses in Sweden

    On the slope leading down to the lake, 37 cows are grazing. Some are drinking water on the shore. The grass is green and if you are standing out in the yard, the view of Lake Storkågeträsket is second to none. No, the rural romanticism cannot be ignored. Then again, this is where the life of one of Sweden’s most well-renowned cheeses begins.

    Ted Logart
  • To the top of Nieras

    The road to Ritsem through World Heritage Laponia is probably one of the most beautiful roads in Sweden. It is also an easy way to get straight to a high-mountain environment with fantastic opportunities for ski touring. The mountain Nieras at Stora Sjöfallet is an amazing and easily accessible ski touring gem.

    David Björkén
  • The travels of a Solar Egg

    The sauna Solar Egg was created by Riksbyggen together with artist duo Bigert & Bergström and installed in Kiruna. Since then, the sauna has become a global success and taken on a tour around the world.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Sweden’s highest mountain station

    One thousand, two hundred and twenty-eight metres above sea level is where you find Sweden’s highest mountain station: Låktatjåkko. It takes you a couple of hours to walk there from Björkliden and halfway is probably where you’ll start craving the waffles.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • A hideaway for all seasons

    We were kindly allowed to read the guestbook from Logger's Lodge, filled with ecstatic reviews from world celebrities, ordinary people and people in love who have visited to forget about all the must-dos for a while and get utterly spoilt. We felt we had to go there ourselves to experience it.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • A design favourite

    What started with a film featuring a small wooden hut in the forest has become a cool hotel. These days Treehotel in Harads is considered one of the world's foremost travel destinations. But Treehotel is more than just a design favourite among the treetops. It’s the childhood fantasy we’ve all dreamed of – just in a more luxurious package.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • A run through magical mountains

    The helicopter takes us to the starting point, 18 kilometres out in the roadless land. The mountain terrain is magical. I cannot find a better word to describe it. Then there are sweat, pain, and doubts. Followed by laughter, pleasure, and euphoria. When it’s all over, all I can think about is: Why don’t all races take place in the mountains of Swedish Lapland?

    Petter Norén
  • Jokkmokk’s market

    On the first weekend in February, every year since 1606, Jokkmokk's market is held. Apart from world-class Sámi art, culture and handicraft, visitors are usually greeted by proper, cold winter weather.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Winter swimming

    February means time for the Scandinavian Winter Swimming Championship in Skellefteå. The championship is also part of the Winter Swimming World Cup as well as an appreciated festival for the entire city – all founded on a declaration of love for the cold and dark.

    Ted Logart
  • First time dog sledding

    If it’s the first time, you have ever met a pack of enthusiastic huskies, no wonder you would be a bit reserved. However, there’s absolutely nothing to be afraid of. Join the British couple, Sabina and Pete, for their first encounter with some of Skellefteå’s furry residents.

    Ted Logart
  • Living in a dream

    Niehku means dream in Northern Sámi. In Riksgränsen, two friends have built a hotel. One of them used to run the piste machine and is now a mountain guide. The other one used to run moguls and has become Sweden's most famous sommelier. These days they run a hotel together. Living the dream.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • An autumn hike in Abisko

    Autumn… It can be really boring… and dreary… and just… just wonderful! Autumn is so immediate; it makes its first appearance after a chilly night and then moves on at full speed. Its colours and clear air must be experienced in the same immediate way: right now!

    Maria Sirviö
  • The master’s
    playground

    Kristoffer Turdell from Gällivare is a champion of Freeride World Tour, the World Championship of Extreme skiing. His scene may be all the mountains in the world, but there's still one particular run on his mind. Down Duolbagorni in Swedish Lapland.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Breaking the ice

    To go on a boat trip and take a swim while you’re at it is a pretty common activity around the world, in Swedish Lapland as well. But in Piteå, just a hundred kilometres south of the polar circle, the considerably less common twist is that the boat trip happens in minus 20 degrees Celsius with an icebreaker that weighs in at 400 metric tons.

    Anders Westergren
  • The food creator

    She moved from Stockholm to Swedish Lapland in her twenties to work at a mountain station and had her first life-changing experience. Several years later she had the next one as she found her calling as an ambassador for the taste of Swedish Lapland. Meet Eva Gunnare – food creator and curious explorer of nature.

    Therese Sidevärn
  • The mountain flora

    Are you curious about what kind of plants that grow in the harsh mountain climate? Ever wondered what that cute, white flower is called that you passed several times on your hike? Göran Wallin gives you a quick guide to the flora of the Swedish Lapland mountains.

    Göran Wallin
  • Kebnekaise
    in spring colours

    Anders and his friends climbed Kebnekaise, Sweden's highest mountain. This is a story about Kebnekaise in spring colours.

    Anders Westergren
  • The eight seasons

    In Swedish Lapland, nature plays an intrinsic role in our life and work, and the people here are highly sensitive to the small details of the changing seasons. Therefore, it seems only natural that the Sámi people describe eight seasons instead of four.

    Ella Jonsson
  • Winter fat biking

    There is something special about biking: the freedom and the access to trails as well as beautiful views. And there is something very special about biking on a fat bike. Have you ever tried a fat bike? Perhaps you have, but not in Swedish Lapland. Let me tell you about darkness and light.

    Sanne Brännström
  • At Pinetree Lodge

    Five kilometres beyond the end of the public road you’ll find the village Särkimukka in the Torne Valley. In the middle of the woods, on a frozen lake, this is home to four people and around two hundred dogs. People from all over the world come here to experience winter and an Arctic adventure. Most of them go home a friendship richer: a four-legged friendship.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • A ski expedition in Sarek

    Rosemary Rayfuse gave herself a ski expedition in Sarek National Park as a birthday gift for herself – and she would not regret it. This is her story from the Sarek Ski Expedition.

    Rosemary Rayfuse
  • Christmas

    It is December and the landscape is covered in a white blanket; trees are heavy with snow and the roads are white. The dense mid-winter darkness creates a blue light during a few hours, and windows are lit up by advent stars and candlesticks. Christmas is here.

    Emma Ebermark
  • A wildlife photographer

    Imagine what it would be like for a few days to leave all the stress and all the noise behind you, breathing in the forest scent and meeting its four-legged or winged residents face to face and assuming the role of a real nature photographer.

    Ted Logart
  • The big closing party

    It's all about turning. No jumps, no flips, no rails. Just the beautiful art of being able to turn on a snowboard. But apart from that Riks Banked Slalom is just a great happening in May.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • A night at the station

    What happens when you combine a delicious dining experience with the world's best location for the northern lights? Well, perhaps you can call it a perfect night at the Station.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Winter swim with Christof Wandratsch

    When extreme swimmer Christof Wandratsch became the first person to cross lake Boden and broke the world record across the English channel, he found himself looking for new challenges. He found winter swimming and the rest, as they say, is history.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Out of reception

    Places still exist where there's no point asking for the password for the wifi. Places where you leave your mobile behind to spend some quality time with others – or perhaps with yourself.  The Sámi eco-lodge Geunja and the camp in Tjuonajokk are two of Swedish Lapland's finest.

    Håkan Stenlund
  • Fishing for pike

    For many people, the highlight of summer is a fishing trip or two, either in a boat or walking along the river with a fishing rod. In Swedish Lapland, we have plenty of waters: rivers, streams, tribut...

    Maria Söderberg
  • Virtual Reality

    An interactive experience Obviously the best way to enjoy Swedish Lapland is to go on an adventurous trip. However, the second-best way is to see it in virtual reality. We have put together an experi...